This week’s highlights:  Make Your iPhone Work For You, Google’s Best Developers, and Sustainable Growth

Fifteen on Friday – Issue 312


Food for Thought:

  1. BetterHumans – How to Configure Your iPhone to Work for You, Not Against You  The Very, Very Complete Guide to Productivity, Focus, and Your Own Longevity
  2. NYT – What Straight-A Students Get Wrong  If you always succeed in school, you’re not setting yourself up for success in life.
  3. TheAtlantic – Does It Matter Where You Go to College?  Research suggests that elite colleges don’t really help rich white guys. But they can have a big effect if you’re not rich, not white, or not a guy.
  4. RH – How To Digest Books Above Your “Level” And Increase Your Intelligence – To do great things, you have to read to lead.
  5. NYMag – 23andMe Informed Me My Husband and I Are Related

Business/Economics:

  1. NewYorker – The Friendship That Made Google Huge   Coding together at the same computer, Jeff Dean and Sanjay Ghemawat changed the course of the company—and the Internet.
  2. NYT – Why the Ivy League Clings to a Strategy of Diminishing Returns
  3. TBP – Supply of New U.S. Housing  Consider this: from 1968 to 2008, a span of 40 years, there was only one year in which fewer new housing units were built than in 2017
  4. Bloomberg – Madoff’s Victims Are Close to Getting Their $19 Billion Back
  5. Bloomberg – Yep, Bitcoin Was a Bubble. And It Popped.  Millennials, like generations before them, just got a painful lesson about speculation.

Culture/Tech/Science:

  1. JC – Do Things You Can Sustain Southwest turned down over 95% of the offers and began serving just 4 new locations in 1996. They left significant growth on the table. Why would a business turn down so much opportunity?
  2. Fluxx – 52 things I learned in 2018 – Credit RK
  3. Engadget – Intel unveils a groundbreaking way to make 3D chips  “Foveros” will let Intel stack logic chips on top of each other.
  4. Economist – Gut bacteria may offer a treatment for autism.  A common probiotic holds the key
  5. NYT – Your Apps Know Where You Were Last Night, and They’re Not Keeping It Secret